Tag Archives: Tim Newby

Hot August Music Festival prepares to celebrate 25 years

Words & Photos: Tim Newby

Few festivals last 25 years, even fewer last that long with as a committed devotion to excellence and the independent streak that has been their defining principles since their first days.  As the Hot August Music Festival returns for its 25th year on August 19, 2017, once again to Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, Maryland that devotion will be on full display with a lineup that runs the musical gamut. Continue reading Hot August Music Festival prepares to celebrate 25 years

Jimmy Herring & The Invisible Whip: Music Reflecting Life

Words: Tim Newby
Photos: Josh Mintz

“The invisible whip is the force that motivates you and your life depends on it,” explains guitarist Jimmy Herring about the inspiration for his new project, Jimmy Herring & The Invisible Whip. “It is like having a cocked gun at your back.  It is the motivating factor.”  Continue reading Jimmy Herring & The Invisible Whip: Music Reflecting Life

The Trongone Band: Southern Rock Soul

By: Tim Newby

 

Band: The Trongone Band (Official Webpage)

Hometown: Richmond, Virginia

Members:  Andrew Trongone (guitar/vocals) Johnny Trongone (drums/ vocals), Ben “Wolfe” White (keys/ vocals),                               Todd Herrington (bass/ vocals)

Sounds Like:  A boogie-woogie shot of whiskey delivered with a deep taste of southern-rock soul.

For Fans Of:  Little Feat, Black Crowes, Drive By Truckers Continue reading The Trongone Band: Southern Rock Soul

Electric Love Machine: Outer Space Adventure

By: Tim Newby

Photo: Rich Barnstein

Band: Electric Love Machine (Official Webpage)

Hometown: Baltimore, MD

Members:  Jon Wood (Guitar, Vocals), Jon Brady (Keyboards, Vocals), Alex Lang (Bass), Evan Lintz (Drums)

Sounds Like:  An outer space adventure through sound that touches on a diverse universe of elements including electronic, traditional Americana, funk, and improvisational jazz.  

For Fans Of:  Disco Biscuits, Sound Tribe Sector 9, Dopapod, 

Bio:  Electric Love Machine is an electronic fusion ensemble from Baltimore, Maryland comprised of longtime veterans of the Baltimore music scene.  Electric Love Machine features Jon Wood (guitar), Jon Brady (keys), Evan Lintz (drums), and Alex Lang (bass) and has been delivering their brand of danceable electro-funk across the country since they formed in 2013.  Their power-house sound has not gone unnoticed as they won the 2016 Maryland Music Award for best Electronic Act.  They released their debut album Xenofonex in 2013, followed by their sophomore release Love Deluxe in 2017. Continue reading Electric Love Machine: Outer Space Adventure

DelFest Preview 2016, preparing to celebrate 10 years

By: Tim Newby

 

In celebration of its 10th year, DelFest has assembled an All-Star roster for its annual Memorial Day Weekend extravaganza in Cumberland, Maryland.  This year’s lineup is topped by the Trey Anastasio Band, Govt Mule, the Travelin’s McCoury’s featuring Dierks Bentley, Leftover Salmon, Railroad Earth, and Bela Fleck & Chris Thile, is easily one of the best festival schedules around.  Throw in namesake Del McCoury’s four sets over the weekend (which includes the traditional festival opening “soundcheck” set, and a guest laden spot which will feature Dan Auerbach from the Black Keys, Jon Fishman from Phish, the Preservation Hall Horns from New Orleans, and Ronnie Bowman) and the guarantee that Del will sit in with what seems like every band throughout the weekend and you would be hard pressed to find a better four days of music over Memorial Day Weekend this year. Continue reading DelFest Preview 2016, preparing to celebrate 10 years

John Mooney & Bluesiana: A Lifetime of the Blues

By: Tim Newby

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Band: John Mooney & Bluesiana (Official Webpage)

Hometown: New Orleans, LA

Members:  John Mooney (guitar), Rene Coman (bass), Kevin O’Day (drums)

Sounds Like: A lifetime of the blues lived in the funk of New Orleans.

For Fans Of: Son House, Professor Longhair, Dr. John Continue reading John Mooney & Bluesiana: A Lifetime of the Blues

The Dirty Grass Players: Forward-thinking bluegrass with a rock ‘n’ roll soul

Pilgrim Profiles: Your guide to the freshest faces in grass-roots music

By: Tim Newby

Image may contain: 5 people, people smiling, people playing musical instruments, guitar and outdoor

Band: The Dirty Grass Players (Official Webpage)

Hometown: Baltimore, MD

Members:  Ben Kolakowski (Guitar), Ryan Rogers (Mandolin),     Colin Rappa (Bass), Alex Berman (Banjo), Alex Tocco (Violin)

Sounds Like: Forward-thinking, innovative bluegrass played with an exploratory, rock ‘n’ roll soul. Continue reading The Dirty Grass Players: Forward-thinking bluegrass with a rock ‘n’ roll soul

The Great Folkgrass Happenstance

 

The Great Folkgrass Happenstance

October 15, 2016

Ruins Park, Glen Rock, PA

Writer: Tim Newby

Photographer: Doug Martin

 

Taking place at Ruins Park in Glen Rock, PA, the 2nd Annual Great Folkgrasss Happenstance Festival highlighted some of the mid-Atlantic’s best and most exciting, upcoming bluegrass and folk bands in one of the most unique locations every chosen to host a festival.  Ruins Park is the re-purposed ruins of the historic Enterprise Manufacturing Company’s warehouse.  Over the years the historic warehouse deteriorated into a concrete shell.  In 2013 in it was transformed into an art and music venue.  The walls are continually transformed with every evolving art and murals that decorate the building’s wall. The space is unique in that portions of structure remain, providing a sheltered enclosure that is still open-air.  The stages have been built from pieces of the walls that have crumbled down and been re-purposed to create two performances stages.

img_6287The Great Folkgrass Happenstance Festival uses this unique space to showcase some of the best regional acts throughout the day including Pennsylvania bands, Colebroook Road and Mountain Ride and Baltimore acts The Dirty Grass Players and the day’s headliner Caleb Stine.  Both Colebrook Road and Mountain Ride have seen their profile’s grow dramatically over the past year with a series of increasingly more prestigious shows. Colebrook Road has been touring steadily and was selected to be part of the lineup for the International Bluegrass Music Association award winning Charm City Bluegrass Festival in April.  Mountain Ride is a hard-hitting bluegrass band from western Pennsylvania who perfectly straddles that dynamic jamgrass sound while still staying true to the music’s roots.  They have recently been tapped by current jamgrass darlings, Cabinet, to be part of their New Year’s Eve celebration at the TLA in Philadelphia.  Baltimore based the Dirty Grass Players is another band who is starting to find their stride, and whose name will soon be a regular part of shows and festivals across the country. The debut album is slated for early next year and will be their coming out party to a much wider audience.

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The festival headliner, Caleb Stine, is a longtime Baltimore stalwart, who is perhaps the most criminally overlooked, but most stunningly powerful songwriter around.  His music lives in the realm of Townes Van Zandt and Gram Parsons, by way of a trip to the mountains to visit Ola Belle Reed.  He is an engaging performer who pulls everyone in with his highly intense and personal sets that make even those in the back feel like they are having a personal conversation with him.  This personal touch even included a repeating his song “Butter” at the request of six-year old who was dancing in front of the stage the whole set and wanted to hear the song again because it was his, “favorite!”

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The unique personality of Ruins Park and the laid back feel fostered by the crowd created a welcoming, community, atmosphere in which the music truly never stopped.  Ruins Park has two stages, both of which are built from re-purposed sections of the wall that have fallen down. The larger, main stage stands firmly at one end, while a smaller stage is just off the side.  During the brief downtime while band’s changed on the main stage, open jams were held on the side stage.  Anyone was welcome to join, and it was not uncommon to see band members who had just finished playing wander over and join in with the rollicking, open jam taking place.

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It is great in this day and age, when there are seemingly mega festivals every day of the year, that find you camped miles from the stage and forced to endure long waits and walks between stages, to still be able to find festivals like the Great Folkgrass Happenstance, that is part of the fabric of its community, and lets that spirit of the community permeate the day, creating an event that allows you to discover new music, new art, and new friends.

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Hot August Music Festival

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Words by Tim Newby/ Images by Tim Newby & Russell Stoddard

Firmly established as one of the Mid-Atlantic’s premier one-day music festivals, The Hot August Music Festival, returned for its 23rd installment with a diverse line-up that kept alive the deep tradition of musical greatness that first started 23 years ago in founder Brad Selko’s backyard.

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The line-up this year tended towards a rootsy, bluegrassy sound with the Punch Brothers, Infamous Stringdusters, Railroad Earth, Cabinet, and the Sligo Creek Stompers all making appearances throughout the day. But as with Hot August Music Fest’s past, the line-up reflected a wide-range of musical tastes, allowing one to bounce between the three stages and satisfy all their musical desires and needs.  Looking for some blustery-rock? Swing by the man stage for the guitar-thrash of Shakey Graves. Need some Electro-funk?  Head over to the side-stage for the high-octane explosion of Pigeons Playing Ping-Pong. Trying to find some swampy-New Orleans soul?  The Revivliasts are on right before the Stringdusters.  Looking for some smooth blues?  Find the stage in the woods and catch Jarekus Singleton’s scintillating set.

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After all that the day ended with a nostalgic blast from The Counting Crows who showed that twenty-years on they still have it as they plowed through set that was chock-full of some of their greatest hits, “Rain King,” “Omaha,” “Long December,” and some choice covers, Bob Dylan’s “Ain’t Going Nowhere,” and The Velvet Underground’s “Elizabeth.”

 

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With fourteen bands, spread over three stages at the picturesque setting of Oregon Park, Hot August Music Festival was quite simply a treat for the musical soul.

 

Click the thumbnail(s) for more images from the fest by Tim Newby…

 

Click the thumbnail(s) for more images from the fest by Russell Stoddard…

 

 

Bluegrass in Baltimore: The Hard Drivin’ Sound and its Legacy (excerpt)

Honest Tune Features Editor Tim Newby’s new book, Bluegrass in Baltimore: The Hard Drivin’ Sound and its Legacy has recently been published by McFarland Books.

 

With an influx of Appalachian migrants who came looking for work in the 1940s and 1950s, Baltimore found itself populated by some extraordinary mountain musicians and was for a brief time the center of the bluegrass world. Life in Baltimore for these musicians was not easy. There were missed opportunities, personal demons and always the up-hill battle with prejudice against their hillbilly origins. Based upon interviews with legendary players from the golden age of Baltimore bluegrass, Bluegrass in Baltimore provides the first in-depth coverage of this transplanted-roots music and its broader influence, detailing the struggles Appalachian musicians faced in a big city that viewed the music they made as the “poorest example of poor man’s music.

 

Bluegrass in Baltimore examines the highly-influential scene in Baltimore that produced such key figures as Del McCoury, Earl Taylor, Walt Hensley, Alice Gerrard, Hazel Dickens, Mike Seeger, and Mike Munford and explores the impact the music they made had on a wide-range of musical luminaries including Jerry Garcia, Jorma Kaukonen, Sandy Rothman, Pete Wernick, Sam Bush, and many others.  

 

The book is available for purchase now: McFarland Books

 

(Excerpted from Bluegrass in Baltimore: The Hard Drivin’ Sound and its Legacy by Tim Newby, published by McFarland Books, June 2015.)

 

coverOn a cold night in early February 1963, in a small nondescript neighborhood in Southeastern Baltimore, on the corner of Pratt and Chapel Streets, in the shadow of Johns Hopkins Hospital there was a small bar that you would have been hard pressed to find then, and does not exist now.  Called the Chapel Café, it had a much too low ceiling with bad lights that seemed to do nothing but provide a ghostly haze that gave life to the heavy cigarette smoke lingering in the dank air.  This served to make the ill-mannered, boorish disposition of the locals hunched over the bar even more menacing as they seemed to revel in yelling “play or get out” at the band perched on the small stage every time there was a lull in the music.   The fourteen-year-old bassist on stage that night remembers it as “nothing but cigarette smoke and spilled beer, one of them rough places, the kind of place where the bouncer would have to throw out at least one guy a night.”  Into this atmosphere, across the sticky beer-splattered floor, beyond the bar area that was just to the right of the door and over towards the stage tucked into the corner on the opposite wall walked a man.

 

all vue inn
(Typical scene in a Baltimore Bar in 1966. Courtesy of Chris Warner)

 

This bar was much like countless other bars that were littered across Baltimore; Jazz City just a couple blocks away on Pratt street in Fells Point, the 79 Club in Federal Hill, the legendary Cozy Inn, and the chicken wire-covered stage at Oleta’s and Marty’s Bar KY.  They were all tough beer-and-a-shot joints that were small, worn down, reeking of stale beer, and teetering on the edge of violence each night.

 

But the man who walked into the Chapel Café that night was not like the countless other patrons who inhabited them.  He was a tall man who cut an imposing figure and known to be of few words.  He was often referred to as an “ornery old cuss” by those that did not know him, though in reality he was a much more complex man than that simple, limiting description.  He also had started a band that lent its name to a still developing sound that had its roots in the mountains of Appalachia, found its way to the city streets, and was now being played in this poorly-lit bar, much like it was at similar other bars around Baltimore.  This sound was still shaking off its earlier label of hillbilly, so-named for the migrants who brought this music with them when they came down from the mountains or moved from the south to the cities to find work and a better life, and was beginning to be recognized by another, less derogatory name: Bluegrass.

 

The man who walked into that small corner bar was Bill Monroe, who with his band Bill Monroe and his Blue Grass Boys had first given shape and life to this new exciting style of music.  Bluegrass was born from the old time string band music that Monroe learned in his youth back in his rural home in Rosine, Kentucky, and from the fiddle of his favorite uncle, Pendleton Vandiver, who Monroe went to live with after his parents died when he was a teenager.  Uncle Pen would become a role model for Monroe in all aspects of life, but it was through music that he would have his greatest impact on the young budding musician.  Years later, after Monroe’s musical genius was widely recognized, he would give credit to his Uncle Pen referring to him as “the fellow I learned how to play from.”   Monroe would later immortalize his Uncle in one of his most famous songs, “Uncle Pen,” in which he sang about the late night hoedowns and dances he played at as a teenager with his Uncle.

 

Bill_Monroe_-_Mr._Blue_GrassMonroe mixed his Uncle Pen’s fiddle sound with the country, gospel, and blues that was in the air at the time, and ratcheted it up to a breakneck speed with his distinctive trademark mandolin to create what famed folklorist and musicologist Alan Lomax called “Folk music with overdrive” in a 1959 article for Esquire Magazine.   Levon Helm from Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Famers The Band saw Monroe as a six-year-old and says this new style of music “really tattooed my brain.”  He recalled how Monroe had taken, “that old hillbilly music, sped it up and basically invented what is now known as bluegrass music:  the bass in its place, the mandolin above it, the guitar tying the two together, and the violin on top, playing the long notes to make it all sing.  The banjo backed the whole thing up, answering everybody.”   Country music-outlaw Waylon Jennings would echo Helms’ sentiment about the impact of Monroe and this new style of music he was playing.  “In my house, in Littlefield, Texas, it was the bible on the table, the flag on the wall, and Bill Monroe’s picture beside it.  That’s the way I was raised.”   And for a brief time nowhere was this new style of hillbilly music, this folk music with overdrive, played better, faster, or in such a way that it would leave as permanent a footprint on the history and development of bluegrass than in Baltimore.

 

The teenaged bassist, Jerry McCoury, who was on stage that cold February night at the Chapel Café in 1963, recalled with a laugh when Monroe walked into the tiny Baltimore bar, “I actually didn’t recognize him at first.  He was wearing his glasses and he had a hat on.  Then I realized who it was and I was in total awe.”  With admiration and high praise in his voice he continues, “It was like meeting God.”

 

Monroe’s stop in Baltimore was no accident. He had stopped by to see a former member of his band, Jack Cooke, who was playing that evening. Monroe needed a couple of players to fill out his band for an upcoming gig at New York University in New York City for the Friends of Old Time Music on February 8, just a few days later.  He was hoping Cooke would join him on guitar, and he wanted to check out the older brother of McCoury who was a banjo player Cooke had recommended.

 

McCoury’s 22-year-old banjo playing older brother, remembers that same evening when the man rightly called the “Father of Bluegrass” walked in during their set:

We were playing the Chapel Café in Fells Point one night in 1963, when Bill Monroe walked in front of us. I could have fallen over right then and there.  The purpose of him stopping by was to take Jack [Cooke] with him up there to play a show in New York City. He didn’t have a guitar player or lead singer at the time.  Whoever it was had quit and he thought Jack would do it.  He also didn’t have a banjo player either so they took me up there to play.

 

Bill Monroe,June 1963
(l to r: Bessie Lee Mauldin, Bill Monroe, Monroe’s daughter, Melissa, Joe Stuart, Bill “Brad” Keith” , Del McCoury in 1963. Courtesy of Russ Hooper)

 

The banjo player, Jerry’s older brother Delano, joined Monroe’s band, which at the time included Kenny Baker on fiddle and Monroe’s longtime partner Bessie Lee Mauldin on bass.  After the show in New York City Delano joined the band full-time, and at the request of Monroe he switched from banjo to guitar and took over lead vocals as well.  It proved to be a career-defining break for the young banjo player turned guitarist/singer.  Though his time with Monroe was short, it was an influential time as the bluegrass legend helped introduce the world to the voice of Del McCoury, a voice which might be the most perfect in bluegrass, a voice that is the living embodiment of the “high and lonesome” sound, a voice about which country music superstar Vince Gill declares, “I would rather hear Del McCoury sing ‘Are You Teasin’ Me?’ than just about anything.”

 

DSCN7297editedSince his brief time with Monroe, McCoury has gone onto establish himself as one of the truly legendary figures in the genre.  He was inducted into the International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) Hall of Fame in 2011, has released over thirty albums, won fifteen IBMA awards – including being named entertainer of the year nine times  (with four straight wins from 1997-2000) – and won two Grammy Awards in 2006 and 2014 for his albums, The Company We Keep and Streets of Baltimore.  He is a man whose roots stretch back to the earliest days, but who stands firmly in the now. A man who is not afraid to collaborate with any number of bands who might be assumed to be outside the normal wheelhouse and comfort zone of an aging bluegrass legend, mixing it up with younger bands like Phish, Yonder Mountain String Band, The String Cheese Incident, Old Crow Medicine Show, Leftover Salmon, and Steve Earle.  Bands that are pushing the sound his one-time mentor Bill Monroe first created so many years ago into new and bold directions.

 

Bob Baker and The Pike County Boys
(top row l to r: Mike Seeger, Hazel Dickens, Bob Shanklin. Bottom row Dickie Rittler, Bob Baker. Courtesy Russ Hooper)

For Monroe to stumble upon such an absurdly talented player in Baltimore was no lucky break. During the fifties and sixties Baltimore was teeming with talent and a rare convergence of people.  In addition to Del McCoury, a host of other influential pickers and musicians all would emerge from Baltimore during this time, including Mike Seeger, Bill Clifton, Earl Taylor and the Stoney Mountain Boys (the first bluegrass band to grace the stage at Carnegie Hall), the pioneering duets of Hazel Dickens & Alice Gerrard, and the groundbreaking banjo wizardry of Walt Hensley.  They would all help to introduce the hard-driving style that was best found in its most pure form in those rough, corner bars on the streets of Baltimore, and bring this energetic style to the music world at large.

 

Baltimore was one of the few places in the United States where musicians from the mountains and the South could meet and play with folks likely outside of their normal social strata.  College-educated city folk and hillbilly migrants from Appalachia mingled easily in Baltimore over the common-ground of music, and in particular string-band and early bluegrass music.  Seeger provides the best explanation of Baltimore’s unique personality as a city:

We were quite conscious in Baltimore of being a place where the city and the country met.  You’d have tough bluegrass bars, where the city people were the outsiders. You’d have bohemian parties, where the country people were the outsiders. It was a place where different classes and different cultures were meeting. It was a time of curiosity and discovery and friction and exhilaration.

 

B.Baker& B.Shanklin
(House party 1959 w/ Bill Ray Baker and Bob Shanklin. Courtesy Russ Hooper)

Much of the focus on bluegrass as it relates to its growth in cities tends to revolve around Nashville, with its well-deserved Music City title, and the bluegrass scene that eventually developed in Washington D.C. around such genre-defining bands as the Country Gentleman and The Seldom Scene.  While there were many other urban settings at the time with a large population of Appalachian migrants and that also had important urban hillbilly scenes, it can be argued that none of them had the lasting impact that Baltimore did.  During those early years that saw the identity of bluegrass truly formed, it was the vibrant, special scene a short drive north of D.C. on I-295 in Baltimore that Seeger recalled which truly laid the foundation.  With his trademark chuckle Del McCoury agrees:

There was Nashville, and then there was Baltimore.  There were other places, Detroit was pretty big, and Cincinnati, there was a big bluegrass scene in those two cities, and Washington [D.C.] as well, but Baltimore was the hot town for this kind of music back in the fifties and sixties.

 

In the years following World War II, as the factories and industries boomed there was an exodus from the mountains and the South into the cities and Baltimore found itself the recipient of an extraordinarily talented crop of musicians who settled into an area ripe with possibilities and opportunities.  In a house on Eager Street that held weekly gatherings of like-minded urban folk-music people and hillbillies, in neighborhoods across Baltimore called “Little Appalachia,” in “hillbilly ghettos” where migrants clustered in the cramped row houses that hosted nightly pickin’ parties, and in the working-class bars that could just as easily erupt in a brawl as they could in live music, the sound of hillbilly or bluegrass music was not only being played, but redefined and pushed in new directions.

 

pickin on newgrassThese sounds soon started reaching the ears of young, impressionable musicians across the country who were just beginning to find their way musically.  Sam Bush, one of the originators of the modern bluegrass sound that began developing in the 1970s, was a teenager in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and one of those young impressionable musicians in the late 1960s when he first came across the “hard-driving Baltimore-style.”   His band, New Grass Revival, was a revelatory shot in the arm to bluegrass music when they burst on to the scene in 1971.  They were a bunch of young hot-shot pickers breaking the normal restrained bluegrass mold at the time with their long hair, jeans, and t-shirts; who, with their psychedelic-influenced take on bluegrass fused everything from jazz, funk, blues and rock together.  They shook off the shackles that had tethered the genre for too long and changed the face of modern bluegrass.   It was an album Bush came across by Baltimore banjo-picker Walt Hensley that proved to be the first time Bush would discover the spark that would ignite his passion to move bluegrass into new realms and hear a term that would go on to define those early years of Bush’s long, storied career.  Bush heard Hensley’s groundbreaking 1969 album Pickin’ on New Grass, and it blew away the young artist, instigating the formation of the band, New Grass Revival, and was part of the birth of a new style, “Newgrass.” With his mind fully-blown he explained, “He [Hensley] was stretching the boundaries there.”

 

Many of those early Baltimore musicians who inspired that young impressionable talent, like Sam Bush, and helped provide such a unique voice to this still developing musical style, would seem to have been within arm’s reach of making it big, of reaching that musical summit, only to fall short due to a litany of reasons.  With a scene built around a large influx of poor migrants with limited education, it is not surprising to hear McCoury say that the bands in Baltimore “were less professional” than those in other cities, and to find so many players who were so talented on the music side fail so easily on the business side.  This lack of business acumen or professionalism proved to be the biggest hindrance for many musicians from Baltimore.

 

Monroe, Hooper, Dickens
(House party 1966. l to r: Bill Monroe, Russ Hooper, Hazel Dickens. Courtesy Russ Hooper)

For every Del McCoury or Hazel Dickens that clawed their way out of Baltimore and achieved that lofty legendary status there are countless stories of those who could not quite obtain what their seemingly unlimited talent placed within their grasp. Whether due to lack of education, poor business sense, too much drink, a lack of faith in one’s abilities, or quite simply bad luck, many of these Baltimore pickers found that instead of etching their name in big letters on the roll call of greats they were more often than not resigned to the overlooked role of early innovator or forgotten influence.  The scope of these musicians’ influence was wide and far-reaching, but unfortunately as bluegrass musician Artie Werner (who years later played with many of the early pioneers from Baltimore in Cincinnati) says, “People don’t realize how much bluegrass was influenced by Baltimore-area musicians.”   It seems with the passage of time, this has come close to being forgotten, as Baltimore is often overshadowed by their big brother to the south, Washington D.C., and the impact of these pioneering musicians is relegated to a passing memory or a simple mention in a lyric.  But Baltimore’s story is the story of early bluegrass. Without it and the musicians who lived and played there, what we know and hear today would not be the same.