Tag Archives: the Bridge

Low Attendance Makes for High Elevation Performance

Ian Moore
September 30, 2016
The Bridge, Santa Fe, NM
Photographer/Writer: Jake Cudek

Over the weekend, the patronage of the City Different doled out one of its typical practices upon the live music scene: low attendance. Walking into The Bridge as the opener completed, it was easy to see Santa Feans missed an opportunity to experience great musicianship with a turnout of less than 100 people.

Although this factor can lead to diminished performances, this was not the case for guitar extraordinaire Ian Moore and his backing band known as The Lossy Coils. With Moore on guitar, the band consists of Ben Jarrad on bass, Travis Foster on drums, and Greg Beshers on accompanying guitar. As expected from their talent, these gentlemen and their personal histories are nothing to scoff at. Jarrad and Foster are both graduates of the Berklee School of Music. Jarrad is deep in his groove and is often seen swinging the spectrum onstage, from eyes closed to ecstatic implementation, while laying down creative and appropriate lines to the tunes. Foster’s auditory presence is exuberant, while his visual presentation is controlled and attentive. Beshers poker faced playing is both dissonant and melodic and is often accentuated with Townsend-esque fanning of his axe as tunes ascend into the ethereal. As if the superb playing wasn’t enough, the vocal provisions of Jarrad and Beshers rounded out their qualifications as great collaborators to the effort. Although Moore is certainly the front man of this outfit, he warmly welcomes the contributions of his fellow band mates and encourages their outings, often seen by his migration across the stage to engage the band member being showcased, face to face, in high-octane musical exchange.

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Moore who’s currently based out of Seattle, born from the south Texas music scene, this man delivers power in the form of composition, frenetic solos, and expansive and detailed story telling. Delivering a 15 song set filled with hard-edged, rocking originals spanning his career, Moore showed no signs of being deterred by the vacancies, but instead took the opportunity to expand his narrative with the audience, presenting longer renditions of some of his tales that are a cornerstone of his performance. These accounts covered his history of growing up and writing many of his songs in the mountains that surround Santa Fe, a fact that was unknown to many in the crowd. His anecdotes are linear and well thought out and carry an honest presence, each leading up with the history of the next number or his view of the modern world. This aspect lends credit to anyone who travels with the singer-songwriter moniker, and in the case of Moore, his name tag is adorned in all capitals.

As for the band, all seem to be having the time of their lives and spoke highly offstage of their personal relationships with each other and their commitment to music. At night’s end, Moore rewarded the faithful with a move out the guitar god handbook. Announcing the closer, “Closer”, the band started up the soft intro and a few bars into it, the production manager hurriedly approached the stage, letting them know that they were past curfew. Moore smiled and stated,” Sorry, man. Once we start the tune, we gotta play it” and unloaded an extended version to the appreciation of all.

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Although he may not carry the same “popular” recognition of many of his counterparts of the genre, his take on it is nothing to overlook. He presents as a genuine individual, both on stage and off, and seems not to have fallen to the confines of guitar ego. As his tour consists of smaller venues and festivals, this aspect should not speak to the level of his craftsmanship, but instead, it should be revered as the rare opportunity to see someone pour out his heart, soul, and sweat on smaller stages with the colossal prowess that makes legends.

Kyle Hollingsworth Band Brings it to The Bridge

Kyle Hollingsworth Band
August 20, 2016
The Bridge, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Writer/Photographer: Jake Cudek

The Kyle Hollingsworth Band rolled through Santa Fe on Saturday night as part of two- night mini-tour of New Mexico breweries. The Bridge, owned and operated by The Santa Fe Brewing Company, was the venue for night two of this jaunt. For those familiar with the man and his band, excitement was twofold: a visit from one of the long standing members of The String Cheese Incident and the promise of bringing out some of his new compositions produced at the recently founded SCI lab.

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Arriving an hour before doors opened, threatening thunderheads could be seen to the south, and everyone wondered if the weather would hold for the night. Whether because of the potential for rain or the lax motivations of Santa Fe residents, it was apparent that this was not going to be a sold out show. The outdoor venue with the capacity to occupy 1000 people had a mere 100 people.

Although this would have diminished a typical band and a typical audience, those who had shown up had arrived to celebrate a visit from one of their favorites, and let the band know their intent wholeheartedly as they took the stage.

The band took heed and reciprocated with a single set performance that never let up and sounded fresh and invigorated from tune to tune. The set was a mix of numbers from each of Kyle’s three albums, songs performed with SCI and a few covers.

The band kicked off the set with an instrumental version of The Beatles’ “Taxman.” This pulled the audience in from the start, as many in the crowd could be heard singing the more familiar lines. The band collected its dues from the audience and showed no signs of being deterred by the low attendance and instead pushed every aspect of the tune and their instruments.

Up next was “Here We Go,” this song is an automatic smile inducer. Its calypso style bypasses the brain and heads straight to the feet getting them moving and then moves back to the face producing elated beams both on stage and the dance floor.

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The first sandwich of the night came wrapped in the form of “Too Young” with a tasty “Will It Go ‘Round in Circles” center. The segues into and out of Billy Preston’s “Circles” were spot on and well-rehearsed, turning on a dime rather than leading into or out by way of musical meanderings. “I can’t win if that’s all I’m gonna do” the resounding lyric of “Too Young,” connected in perfect juxtaposition to the lyrical context of “Circles,” illustrating the repetitive interpretations of experience and the reminding need to change up personal status quo thinking.

“Pack It Up,” with its distinctive bass intro came next. Although a staple of SCI performances since 2005, this instrumental tune penned by Hollingsworth has only appeared on KH’s latest album, “Speed of Life.” This was received with excitement, as those who were there were certainly cut from the Cheesecloth. Its odd timings reinforced this notion, as many jigged with familiarity to the tune. At its finish, Kyle continued the same driving feel and segued into “All Falls Apart,” cycling between drenching organ solos and piano rifts that continued to lift the feet of the flailing cooperatives.

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A new concoction produced in the SCI lab, “Let Me In” intoxicated the crowd with its soul-funky groove, and continued to contribute to the intimate experience elating many well acquainted with his catalog by this unveiling in the live setting.

“Can’t Wait Another Day” came up next and held a surprise that no one expected. As the tune stepped into decline, the distinct chords of “Terrapin Station” rose from the ashes. As the portion played was the instrumental section of the suite gave way to each of the members hitting the structure with force. Of exceptional note were the heavy bass bombs that got the crowd calling out as the vibration rolled over the crowd in seismic waves.

In Spanish, the term Peregrino refers to something being unusual, odd, and migratory. This epitomizes this Latin flavored tune as it contained a spacy, ethereal quality surrounding a structured root and deviates between throughout its entirety. Both dynamics were presented and continued the dance fest that had been non-stop over the past 90 minutes.

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Viewing the onstage set list, this song was to be the end of the first set. Instead, the band abandoned that notion and labored on with the thick grooves of “Let’s Go Outside.” It was apparent that neither the band nor the patrons were showing any signs of fatigue and both continued in merriment. As the song structure loosened into a jam, a familiar chord structure arose and led into a full version of Peter Gabriel’s “Sledgehammer.” As another popular cover, the crowd began to sing the backup sections of the song. Hollingsworth took notice and called out to the crowd, encouraging them to play the role of backup singer. This invitation inspired the crowd to take it up a level and where there was once bashfulness, there now was a full on sing along of all parts.

“Tumbling,” another new song made in the SCI lab was preceded by the story that inspired the piece. Hollingsworth spoke of a trip to a Grateful Dead show at Three Rivers Stadium in Pennsylvania. This bouncy unit told the story of summer love and the laid back experience that preceded impending Dead shows of yore.

“World Girl” brought out her funky, disco infused moves and the crowd took her hand and worked it. Smiling, spinning, and giggling, the crowd swirled in this dance number.

The light rock tune “So Fine” was the bookends to the second sandwich of the evening and was filled with Hollingsworth’s admitted favorite cereal “Lucky Charms.” Shifting from uplifting light lyrics and progressions, this new song eventually gave way to the crunchy funk of the popular breakfast cereal which had the band and audience coming back for seconds and thirds. The tune kept building and residing back to its head giving each band member the opportunity to jump right into the bowl.

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“Happening Now” with a poppy almost 80’s theme bordered on electronica and reinvigorated many in the crowd to keep their participation going. Although this one motivated the younger attendees well acquainted with attributes of EDM, it was refreshing to see the older component spinning with abandon seemingly recapturing some part of the inner child.

The final three punch closer of the set left no step undanced. Beginning with the slow rising and spacious “Falling Through the Cracks,” the music’s crescendo gave way to Lionel Ritchie’s “All Night Long,” again getting the participants involved in both movement and accompaniment. Taking to the bridge the band began playing double time and eventually moved onto the last lady of the night, “Rosie.” Immediately, the recognition of this number was apparent and was especially exuded by the female faction in attendance. The crowd danced and called out the lyrics as if this was the first song, not the last, and the band rewarded by playing a full and exhausted version devoid of any brevity.

The band left the stage and stood together in the wings, huddled as in conference, but more likely taking the opportunity to catch their breath and composure, having laid down an unbroken set clocking in at just under two and half hours.

Recuperation gained, the band returned for the encore, “The Way That It Goes.” Giving every last drop in the tank the band brought it in full force again and the crowd met them note for note.

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As the threat of thunderstorms had resided behind the band for most of the night, it seemed that the music gods had enjoyed the show as much as the mortals. As the final note of the song came to its end through the PA system, like cosmic clockwork, the sky opened up and a deluge of rain sent both musician and listener running for cover.

Hollingsworth’s style, both in construction and execution, is infectious and literally brings a smile to the face. It easy to tell that he loves what he does and when he sits down to write his material, the notions and movements come from a personal level of trying to raise his own virtue and that of the listener. The band is well rehearsed and attentive to every shift and run at a pace that is equal to one another, including the bandleader. This equality carries over to the joy expressed both facially and emotionally by each member and their auditory accomplishments. Paul McDaniels is the unassuming bass man who digs deep and lays down both structure and improvisation with an unforced demeanor. Brian McRae, the counterpart on rhythm, is notably a blur throughout his performance. His mixture of exclusive cymbal and tom work draws in the attention and his consistent ability to shift makes him a perfect fit to the musicality of this band. Dan Schwindt, known as “Schwindt-Rock” to those close to him, is one of those guys you could pass on the street and never know his extent for burning down the house. His ability to play a moving section in one song and then melt the faces of those around him in the next makes this man more myth than minstrel. The combination of these gentlemen is something not to be missed.

The Bridge to headline the Concert for Hope February 22

bridge8Iconic Balitmore roots-rockers The Bridge will reunite for a special show as they headline the eight annual Concert for Hope February 22 at Baltimore Soundstage.  The Hippy Sheiks will open the evening and Smooth Kentucky will play a special VIP reception before.

 

This annual feature on the local music calendar is a true Baltimore story about giving back. Two local guys — John Miller and Jim Wolff — both had first-hand experiences with the devastating impact of a cancer diagnosis and recognized that knowledgeable support is essential for people facing this disease. John and Jim have partnered with HopeWell Cancer Support, a local nonprofit that provides free support programs and services to individuals and families in Maryland who are coping with cancer, to produce the eighth annual Concert for Hope.

 

An hour-long VIP reception will start at 7 pm, featuring Baltimore-based bluegrass band Smooth Kentucky on stage. Doors for the main show open at 8 pm with the return of Concert for Hope favorites, The Hippy Sheiks. They will be followed by a rare performance by legendary local jam band The Bridge to close the show.

 

A live auction is also part of the event, featuring six themed packages, including:

•             Musician Dream Come True (a Paul Reed Smith electric guitar and private guitar lessons)

•             Music Lovers (tickets to Paul Simon & Sting concert on 3/13/14 at the Verizon Center)

•             Utah Wonderland (5-day/4-night accommodation plus 2 airline tickets)  

 

All proceeds from tickets sold go directly to benefit HopeWell Cancer Support’s programs for individuals and families coping with all kinds of cancer.

 

For further information about the HopeWell Cancer support please visit http://www.hopewellcancersupport.org/

 

Concert for Hope

Dark Star Orchestra & The Bridge to play benefit show for Believe in Music

Believe in Music - DSO & The BridgeAn incredible night benefiting “Believe in Music”
Featuring: Dark Star Orchestra & The Bridge
Pier Six Pavilion, Baltimore, MD 
August 10, 2013

 

 Dark Star Orchestra and The Bridge will come together for one night only to play a special benefit show for Believe in Music (The music division of the Living Classrooms Foundation) at Pier Six Pavilion in Baltimore, MD, August 10, 2013.

 
 
Founded by Kenny Liner of The Bridge, Believe in Music is a new Living Classrooms program operating at the POWER House facility in the Eastside Children’s Target Investment Zone. The program aims to uplift underprivileged Baltimore City students academically, culturally, and spiritually, while promoting self-expression and community awareness through music education. Through the program, students will foster a deep connection with music in their own lives, and gain the tools to be able express their culture, struggles, and triumphs through music. Students will come away from the program seeing music as a  way to uplift themselves as well as their community.

 

To learn more about Believe in Music please view this video.

 

Tickets are on sale now and can purchased online.
http://www.piersixpavilion.com/event/241837-believe-in-music-benefit-dark-baltimore/

 

www.believe-in-music.org
https://www.facebook.com/believehon
follow on twitter @believeinmusic5
http://vimeo.com/52852155

 

Cris Jacobs & the Band of Johns fires up the hometown

Cris Jacobs & the Band of Johns

8×10

Baltimore, MD

February 2, 2013

 

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Since The Bridge called it quits just over a year ago, singer-guitarist Cris Jacobs has shown no signs of slowing down as he is a man constantly on the move exploring as much musical ground as he can cover, whether with his new project The Cris Jacobs Band (who released their debut album last year), as part of his long-time bluegrass band Smooth Kentucky, in the various guest spots and sit-ins he appears in with everyone from Anders Osborne to Los Lobos, or in his recent recording session with New Orleans legend Ivan Neville. On a night when his hometown of Baltimore was teeming with excitement in anticipation of the Ravens appearance in the Super Bowl the following day, Jacobs debuted his latest endeavor, The Band of Johns, at his home away from home, The 8×10.

 
Comprised of keyboardist John Ginty (John Ginty Band, Santana, Robert Randolph & the Family Band),drummer John Thomakos (John Mooney, Vanessa Carlton), and bassist Jake Leckie (Cris Jacobs Band) the quartet played together for the first time ever on this evening. With the city already _MG_5284brimming with energy and enthusiasm for the Ravens upcoming Super Bowl appearance, Jacobs show at the 8×10 took on the air of an almost surreal pep-rally at times, with many in the crowd decked out in purple or Ravens jerseys, including both Jacobs in a Ray Lewis jersey and Thomakos in an Ed Reed jersey. Jacobs made numerous references throughout the night to the game, and the inclusion of a couple ofr New Orleans themed covers in “Down South of New Orleans” and “Going Down to New Orleans” only served as another sly reference to the next day’s big game down in the Big Easy. But the most obvious Super Bowl reference came as the band was deep in the midst of a particularly adventurous journey through Jacobs’ old band The Bridge’s long-time live staple “Bad Locomotive.” As the song evolved into a dark swirling jam, the unmistakable driving bass and drum rhythm of the White Stripes “Seven Nation Army” began to show, slowly poking its face out from underneath the familiar chords of “Bad Locomotive.” The song has become the unofficial song/ chant of the Baltimore Ravens and their faithful during this past season, with the acapella chanting of its relentlessly, driving melody _MG_5312becoming omnipresent at Ravens games and seemingly every Super Bowl broadcast from New Orleans. This simple jam evoked the same response from the fans packed into the 8×10 who responded with a stadium worthy rendition of the chant, before the band broke it off and led back into “Bad Locomotive.”

 

But this night was not all about the Ravens and the upcoming Super Bowl, though that was definitely a big part of it. The evenings setlist drew heavily from Jacobs large repertoire of material, using the new material that Jacobs has written recently for The Cris Jacobs Band (including “Dragonfly,” “Devil or Jesse James,” and “Stoned on you”), a smattering of old Bridge songs (“Heavy Water,”, “Honeybee,” and “Devil on Me” among others), and a few tasty covers (the aforementioned New Orleans tunes and “You Can Stay but the Noise Must Go”) _MG_5313thrown in for good measure. This highly experienced band made this wide range music all their own. Jacobs’ soulful wail echoes the southern-fried, gravely, timbre of Lowell George, and the addition of the masterful touch of Ginty and the hard-driving, precise drumming of Thomakos seemed to give his voice that much more power on the evening (or maybe it was just the excitement for the Ravens). For many in the crowd in the crowd there was an extreme familiarity with many of Jacobs’ songs, but with addition of such seasoned skillful players as Ginty and Thomakos the music found new and interesting musical paths down which to wind.

 

Still the overriding theme for the show on this chilly night in Baltimore was the energy that came with the anticipation of The Ravens appearance in the Super Bowl the next day, and the night would appropriately end on that note. After wrapping up their set with a spirited take on The Bridge’s “Colorado Motel,” the crowd began shouting their approval and even more boisterous version of the “Seven Nation Army” chant erupted from the crowd as they waited for the band to retake the stage. The band quickly retook the stage. Leckie and Thomakos began to play along with the crowd, churning out the hard-hitting, pulsating rhythm of “Seven Nation Army,” only this time instead a brief tease, Jacobs and Ginty picked up the rhythm and launched into a full-on version of the song that burned with a ferocity that would make the hometown team’s long revered defense proud, and as everyone in the crowd gave their full-throated best to make their chant heard, all eyes turned towards New Orleans and next day’s Super Bowl._MG_5356

 

 

 

Author’s note – The Ravens would go on to win the Super Bowl the next day, the “Seven Nation Army” chant could be heard constantly throughout the game, Baltimore rejoiced, and for just one small moment there was peace in the world.

 

To see all of Jordan August ‘s photos from Jacobs’ surreal pep-rally please visit here.

The Bridge reunite for special show to support the Believe in Music foundation

 

 

After ten years of touring nationally and internationally with The Bridge, Kenny Liner says he has decided to hang up his mandolin and give back to the city he loves through the development of his foundation Believe in Music.  

Believe in Music is a non-profit organization whose aim is to uplift underprivileged Baltimore City students academically, culturally and spiritually. Their mission is to promote self-expression and community awareness through music education. Students will foster a deep connection with music in their own lives, and gain the tools to be able express their culture, struggles and triumphs through music. They will come away from the program seeing music as a way to uplift themselves as well as their community.

Liner’s former band mates in The Bridge will come together for a special reunion show to help raise money for Believe in Music.   As part of the celebration of Baltimore Beer Week, The Maryland Science Center will present a night of incredible music October 27 as The Bridge will reunite for one evening only.  In addition to two full sets from The Bridge, there will be opening sets from Caleb Stine, DJ Who, and Cirque Oya.  There will also be rooftop lounges with DJ sets, a showing of the IMAX movie Hubble 3D, and the Science Center’s exhibits will be remain open throughout the evening.  Beers from the Flying Dog Brewery, Maryland’s largest brewery, will be proudly served.

 

October 27 – Maryland Science Center

The Bridge (2 Sets)

Caleb Stine, DJ Who, and Cirque Oya

 

Tickets can be purchased here http://www.missiontix.com/thebridge

 

Believe in Music is working in partnership with Living Classrooms, a non- profit that has provided innovative educational and job-training programs for youth and young adults in high-risk environments since 1985.  Through Living Classrooms, Believe in Music will hold classes in two youth centers in East Baltimore – the Carmelo Anthony Youth Development Center, which serves kids from six nearby public housing complexes, and The Power House, which serves the youth of Perkins Homes, Baltimore’s largest public housing complex.

The program, which is based on Maryland’s state music education curriculum, runs classes and is intended for students in the elementary and middle school age range, but can be adapted to any age level.  Students will gain a worldview of the musical landscape and learn how to write, perform and record music using non-traditional instruments and rhythmic patterns.

Music will be studied as a creative outlet through its cultural history and context. Students will learn about how music reflects life in Baltimore and beyond, music’s connection to dance, theater and visual arts, and how music functions as an art form and essential part of life around the world.

In addition to gaining a musical worldview, students will learn how to compose, record and perform songs by themselves or with an ensemble. Although none of these skills will require reading music or traditional instruments, students will even learn about improvisation and technology’s ever-changing role in music. The program will also expose students to different careers in music and how they can be creatively fulfilling while also benefitting their community.

 

To make a donation to Believe in Music, please visit here http://www.livingclassrooms.org/news/believeinmusic

 

www.believe-in-music.org
https://www.facebook.com/believehon
Follow on twitter @believeinmusic5

The Bridge : National Bohemian

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On their fifth album Baltimore’s The Bridge seriously ups the ante, offering their best release to date.National Bohemian, which was produced by Los Lobos’ Steve Berlin, is packed with fresh material that places greater emphasis on vocals than the group’s past efforts. The resulting album replaces their improv-heavy jam past with a more authentic, gritty form of cohesively orchestrated Americana rock.

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The Bridge & National Bohemian: Funky Little Moments

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Words by Tim Newby/ photos by Jordan August

“This sounds good. How can we fuck it up,” remembers Bridge guitarist Cris Jacobs being asked by legendary producer Steve Berlin during the recording of their latest album, National Bohemian, which was helmed by Berlin.

Jacobs’ longtime band mate, mandolinist Kenny Liner elaborates, “Steve’s whole attitude is you have heard everything before, so let’s try something you haven’t heard, and that is such an amazingly cool attitude to have as a band going in to record an album.”

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Hot August Blues

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Hot August Blues
Oregon Ridge Park
Cockeysville, Maryland
August 21, 2010

“Them trees are pretty,” joked blues guitarist Keb’ Mo’ midway through his set as he stared up at the rolling green expanse laid out in front of him, and he sure wasn’t lying.  Nestled at the base of a sprawling hill and surrounded by an army of tall trees that provided a natural backdrop for the stage, Oregon Ridge Park is one of the true hidden gems when it comes to festival settings.

You just might forget you’re only a few minutes north of downtown Baltimore.

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The Bridge Announce December Residency

The Bridge have announced plans for a four week residency in December at The Gramercy Theatre in New York City where they'll perform every Monday night of the month. The shows will be free and feature different special guests and opening acts at each performance. It's a fitting conclusion to 2009 for the Baltimore-based band, a year in which they toured prolifically throughout the U.S., including festivals like Wakarusa, All Good and Gathering Of The Vibes and support slots with Derek Trucks Band, Little Feat and Umphrey's Mcgee.
Continue reading The Bridge Announce December Residency