Tag Archives: Old Crow Medicine Show

Hot August Music Festival prepares to celebrate 25 years

Words & Photos: Tim Newby

Few festivals last 25 years, even fewer last that long with as a committed devotion to excellence and the independent streak that has been their defining principles since their first days.  As the Hot August Music Festival returns for its 25th year on August 19, 2017, once again to Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, Maryland that devotion will be on full display with a lineup that runs the musical gamut. Continue reading Hot August Music Festival prepares to celebrate 25 years

Hot August Music Festival: Short lines, long sets, stellar tunes

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Words and Images by Tim Newby

When Hot August Music Festival founder Brad Selko hopped on stage with headliners Old Crow Medicine Show during their show closing version of “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?” to blow some harmonica it proved the perfect way to close the day’s festivities. From its start twenty-two years ago with two acts, to its three stage, thirteen band line-up that it sports now, Hot August Music Festival has established itself as one of the premiere one-day events of the busy Festival season.

Since its beginning in the cozy confines of Selko’s backyard for a couple hundred fans, to its sold-out present day location at Oregon Ridge Park, the Hot August Music Festival has stayed true to Selko’s vision of a creating a high-quality, intimate fan-friendly festival. With only a minor tweak to its name, changing from Hot August Blues to Hot August Music this year – to reflect the growing diversity of bands that fills the line-up each year, Hot August Music Fest has for the last twenty-two years been exactly what Selko hoped it would be.

Topped by Old Crow Medicine Show and Nickel Creek, this year’s line-up was one of the most diverse ever. Over the three stages fans saw everyone from blues-master Tab Benoit, to indie-rockers Dr. Dog, to Brooklyn funksters Turkuaz, to roots-rockers DSCN6048editedCabinet, to electronica-based ELM, to singer songwriter Jordan August. It was a line-up that had something for everyone. Selko’s attention to detail and focus on fan-comfort shows all over the festival as he brings in extra-food vendors, more bathrooms, and has more beer staff all which help to eliminate lines to almost nothing, which in turn leads to happy festival goers who can spend more time watching the stellar music they came for not waiting for their beer and lunch.

The setting of Oregon Ridge also helps to create an extremely fan-friendly environment. The main stage is set at the base of a large hill and is surrounded by a picturesque array of trees which helps create a natural amphitheater and ensures that no matter where you are you have a great, unobstructed view of the stage. The two smaller stages are a short walk away, enabling one to bounce from stage to stage and catch as many acts as possible without missing much action.

Selko’s other over-riding philosophy each year is his willingness to schedule bands with the idea of quality over quantity. He prefers to give each band enough time on stage to really get warmed up and stretch their legs as opposed to the brief forty-five-minute sets that seem to be the norm at too many festivals that instance on shoehorning as many possible bands on stage. Selko gives each band more than ample time to get up and stretch their musical legs.   The main stage’s second act, alt-country rockers Houndmouth, made mention of this during their ninety-minute set when they remarked that it was the longest show they had ever played. Their raucous set saw them blasting through almost all the tunes off of their debut-album, From the Hills Below the City, before wrapping up with a spirited take on Bob Dylan’s “I Shall Be Released.”DSCN6122edited

Following Houndmouth was one of the day’s unquestionable highlights Dr. Dog. The six-piece band from Philly played an eighteen song set that pulled equally from their last four albums with the rarity “Alaska” thrown in to keep the old school fans happy. They also featured a sit-in from festival opener Bosley on “Ain’t It Strange.” Their set was a rocking, high-energy outbreak of fun that had everyone perched on the hillside at Oregon Ridge Park up and grooving.

DSCN6073editedAfter Dr. Dog attention was focused on the two side stages, as bluegrass-themed Cabinet packed the smaller stage that was tucked away in the woods for a rollicking, rambling trip through Americana highlighted by an adventurous version of “Diamond Joe.” As Cabinet wrapped up they gave way to Brooklyn funk-machine, Turkuaz, who were on the larger second stage and started their show via an introduction from the infamous Dr. Rich Barnstein. Turkuaz set was an ass-shaking explosion of funk.

One of the day’s most highly anticipated sets followed, as the reunited Nickel Creek is touring again for the first time since their farewell tour of 2007. As Nickel Creek took the stage it seemed as if everyone in attendance surged toward the main stage creating arguably the largest crowd of the day. The band’s set was a tour through their extensive archive and a strong reminder of what made them such a special band.

DSCN6206editedDespite the absence of blues in the festival’s name, Tab Benoit made sure the blues were not forgotten with a blistering set on the second stage that followed Nickel Creek. His set was a stunning affirmation of the power of New Orleans flavored blues through his mind-bending guitar work. Benoit’s set seemed to almost seamlessly segue from song to song before giving way to the day’s headliner’s Old Crow Medicine Show on the main stage.

Old Crow’s shows are rowdy affairs with band members bouncing around stage, swapping instruments, and throwing out devilishly gorgeous licks. An early guest spot by Baltimore’s unofficial mascot the Natty Boh Man who danced along with the band got things heated up right away. The band, as they always do maintained that peak of energy for their two hour set, blasting through all facets of their vast repertoire, including a boisterous “Humdinger,” a sublime “Take’em Away,” and unsurprisingly “Wagon Wheel.” They wrapped up their headlining spot with a string of covers to close the day starting with a melody of Sam Cooke and Smokey Robinson tunes, before breaking out the perfectly placed “Streets of Baltimore,” which then lead into their common take on Tom Petty’s “American Girl.” The night was brought to a close with a handful of guests as all of Houndmounth, Cabinet, and Selko hit the stage for Bob Dylan’s “Ain’t Going Nowhere,” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?” The joyous celebration onstage was only matched by the joyous celebration and dancing from those in the crowd and was the perfect ending to a perfect festival.

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Review: 2013 Forecastle Music Festival in Louisville, KY

In the decade since it”s inception, the Forecastle Festival in Louisville, Kentucky has grown from a single small stage in the park into one of the premier music events of the year, with host band the String Cheese Incident joined by rap superstar Big Boi, rock gods The Black Keys, local hero Jim James and so many more. Born from founder J.K. McKnight”s wish to unite live music and the spirit of activism on the community level, this annual get together has found a home on the banks of the Ohio River with a widely varied slate of acts on the four stages from the biggest rock bands in the land to the homegrown sounds of bluegrass and everything in between. Partnering with Ashley Capps, one of the founders of Bonnaroo, the massive concert spectacle against which all other fests are measured, McKnight saw his seeded dream grow beyond his wildest imaginings and truly become a showcase for the city he loves, the causes he believes in and the music that has given his life joy.

Since its humble beginnings Forecastle”s focus has been squarely on giving a voice to roots and national level causes, in an effort to demonstrate what could be accomplished from working together. The music was the bait, but illustrating how easy it is for us all to pitch in and steer our lives away from the environmentally and philosophically self destructive course on which we have blithely followed for far too long. Environmentalism, fairness and a wide range of political causes from both sides of the aisle are given prime space along the main concert area, each booth filled with eager minds sparked by the exposure to new ideas, musical and social. With the largest attendance on record for the 2013 edition of Forecastle, more people than ever had the opportunity to learn about responsibility and the rewards of joining in to make the world a better place, and it”s hard to think of a better reason to gather together.

Friday

The Pimps of Joytime

To draw as wide a variety of souls as possible, nearly every musical taste was catered to over the three days of fun in the cities resurrected downtown and it”s green-space jewel, Waterfront Park. Slinky, percussive funksters Brooklynites The Pimps of Joytime opened the Mast Stage on Friday with a dancey sound that had the five o”clock on a Friday crowd ready to shake off their work week doldrums and boogie down.

On the second stage, DIY legend Bob Mould showed why, from his days of founding punk icons Husker Du to today”s hard charging solo work, he is a force to be reckoned with. Prowling the stage like a caged tiger, barely contained rage at the microphone Mould was constantly exploding into wild guitar bursts as he broke free from any tether and let his soul blare from his instrument.

Old Crow Medicine Show

Local rising stars Houndmouth, from just across the river, showed the songwriting and performing skill that earned them slots on the David Letterman show and top tier playlists across the country. While Moon Taxi showed that there are quality rock bands still forming across the country, Dj acts like Salva and Griz illustrated the power of modern machinery in the hands of minds that can compose and create in and of the moment, making reactionary beats that fed off the crowd.

Old Crow Medicine Show, known for their Americana feel and tight live performances brought the first taste of the Bluegrass state”s signature music, and had the crowd twirling an tapping their toes from front to back of the packed lawn at the main stage. Meanwhile Young The Giant poured every iota of energy the possessed into each and every song they played on the Boom Stage, amping the crowd into a frenzy just in time for the weekend”s host band, The String Cheese Incident.

Hailing from Colorado, the String Cheese Incident is a musical chameleon that perfectly represents the modern festival dynamic with a range of styles and influences that make each song both unique and somehow still of a whole. From wide open ballads, dense jams and even a organic homage to the modern dub/electronica movement, Cheese nimbly darts wherever their combined muses take them. The six members of the band, Billy Nershi on lead guitar, multi-instrumentalist Michael Kang on Mandolin, violin and guitar, Kyle Hollingsworth on piano, keyboards and organ, Keith Moseley on bass and the one-two percussive punch of Jason Hann and Michael Travis.

With each member actively involved in creating distinct music of their own, Cheese has become almost a clearing house for ideas distilled from each player”s personal sensibilities. The range of a modern SCI show features an almost relay race dynamic, with each member stepping up to lead tunes that showcase their personal sensibilities, which the rest of the band doing all they could to make each song as rich and diverse as possible. The final product is a blend of music that has led to the String Cheese Incident”s amazing enduring popularity which led them to being asked to play the role of “Host” over the weekend. Playing an epic closing set on Friday, performing a after show at the storied local venue the Louisville Palace, then bringing forth their bluegrass roots for a special Sunday set, Cheese owned the city and the festival itself over the weekend, and under their stewardship people reveled in a state of musical bliss, the best feeling in the world.

Saturday

The 23 String Band

With one of the strongest public radio platforms in the nation, Louisville is blessed to have three stations of music and information operating around the clock, with the wide ranging WFPK leading the way. Home to dozens of programs that showcase everything from blues to punk, as well as free ranging hours left up to their DJs, WFPK regularly hosts one of the stages, giving up and coming artists a chance to show the crowd what they do and how well they do it. Local bluegrass act The 23 String Band drew an impressive crowd to Saturday”s Port stage, some their faithful fans and some just eager to see what the buzz was about. Freakwater and the always artsy Rubblebucket added to their loyal following with fresh converts, all thanks to a station that works around the clock to keep the spirit of music alive in a time of commercialization and homogenization, a truly noble endeavor for which their listeners and the festival patrons thanked them with cheers and out stretched arms.

Alabama Shakes

All around the rest of the festival, Saturday”s line up featured everything from current music darlings like Dawes and Alabama Shakes, Kurt Vile and the Violators, and The UK”s The Joy Formidable all showed why those worried about the state of modern music should not be too concerned. While prepackaged pop does dominate the charts, original bands are working their way into the hearts and minds of the listening public, enticing them to go beyond the norm and seek out the new and original. And, closing out the Boom stage was a band that somehow, even after almost two decades, remains the newest and most original outfit on any platform…the Flaming Lips.

With a long history of epic shows full of weirdness, any chance to see the Flaming Lips perform is an opportunity to peer into the raw, creative world of the band”s off-putting but heartfelt vibe. Their music is a wild mish-mash of crashing drums, layered synthesizers and effect, sub sonic bass and melodic acoustic guitars. The legends and lore that have sprung up around them and their challenging presentation, including entire shows performed to short wave broadcast”s only listenable on headphone, recording a CD that was sectioned off and could only be heard by listening to four separate sound systems at the same time, precede them and make the anticipation build to a fever pitch for their devoted followers.

The Flaming Lips

Eschewing what has, of late, become their trademarks, such as the dancing girls, confetti and day-glo insanity, the band toned down not only their visuals, but offered a few stripped down versions of their songs as well, notably their most anthemic tune, “Do You Realize.” “Realize” went from a bubbly pop ditty with a deeper meaning to a plaintive begging…urging the crowd to make the most of every moment. Tracks from their new release, The Terror were prominently featured in the set list, and were as well received as classics like “She Don”t Use Jelly.” For the initiated true believers who lined up as soon as the gates opened and held down their spots all day to the interested onlookers who wandered towards the show to see what the hype was all there was a wide variety of reactions, from instant love to disdain. From a darkened, mirror ball and smoke filled stage a sense shredding overload was emitted, and those who observed it were changed for the experience, a result provacateurs like the Flaming Lips couldn”t help but appreciate.

Sunday

Tift Merrit

It would be hard to find two more different opening acts than the home spun rock stylings of songstress Tift Merrit and Nigerian born Goumar Almoctar”s Bombino. Though born worlds apart, both acts shared a spirit and underlying theme of overcoming adversity that linked them philosophically, if not musically. NYC rapper El-P and his partner Killer Mike led the folks at the Ocean stage into a furious state, fists pumping in time to their serious rhymes about the state of the world.

Due to an unfortunate cancellation, the schedule for Sunday was remixed, and a more natural paring of styles resulted with masters of the new breed of modern, rock influenced bluegrass Greensky Bluegrass no opening for festival hosts String Cheese Incident”s much hyped instrumental “Bluegrass Incident” set on the Boom Stage. Greensky has built themselves into one of the most well regarded bluegrass bands in the field through their mastery of their respective instruments, with Anders Beck leading the way on his drop steel guitar, heart felt and emotive songwriting by mandolinist Paul Hoffman and a willingness to explore the darker territories of the musical spectrum.

The Bluegrass Incident

You”d be hard put to find any band willing or capable of following the show put on by Greensky Bluegrass, but, as luck would have it, the guys from String Cheese brought a few friends along to help them in their cause. True pioneer of the seventies wave of mixing modern music with classic bluegrass trapping, Sam Bush joined the Incident, banjo player and all around happiest guy at the festival Andy Thorn from Leftover Salmon, along with multi-year award winning “Mandolinist of the Year” Ronnie McCoury and fiddle virtuoso and Kentucky born and bred Jason Carter. Running through classic from both Cheese”s catalog like “Rivertrance” and the bluegrass songbook, the joy of sharing one of the oldest traditions in music, the picking party, was plain to see and a joy to watch, as well as a testament to the competence and confidence of the band. A fitting tribute to the state and the music it has spawned.

Grace Potter & the Nocturnals

Over on the main stage, we were treated to a burst of old school rock with a heap of sex appeal, with the next two acts. First up was Grace Potter and the Nocturnals, bringing their high energy mix of classic rock stylings and satisfyingly original takes on genre conventions, all while being fronted by one of the most beguiling figures to lead a band since the likes of Tina Turner and Janis Joplin. Grace Potter”s charisma and beauty belie her talent, and her comfort onstage in any situation, be it at her organ, with a guitar in her hand s or simply belting out her songs from some unknowable depths kept all eyes riveted to her, a power she used to playfully toy with the fans with a smile and a wink. Potter was following in the wake of a classic archetype, that of a singer using a mix of raw sex appeal and talent to take over a show that was perfected years ago by the man who followed her on the main stage, rock and roll legend Robert Plant.

Robert Plant

Robert Plant“s career is as storied and well known as any in the modern era of music. From fronting Led Zeppelin to his solo career in the eighties, small scale reunion tours with Zep guitarist Jimmy Page, to recent collaborations with Allison Krauss and his current band, The Strange Sensation Plant has shown a longevity that defies logic. Tales of his partying in the past have moved into folklore territory, while his new clean living lifestyle has shown him to be in a healthier state than men half his age marking him as a man more than capable of delighting crowds beyond simple nostalgia. Though Zep classics were on hand, they blended seamlessly with hits from his solo career, world music infused new material and a playful smile and spirit that echoed his most famous of questions…”Does anyone remember laughter?” Forecastle closed with a short rain delayed set from the Avett Brothers, another of many returning acts like the Black Keys, who in the past were part of the daytime festivities now grown to the point of headliners. McKnight openly remarked that bands enthusiasm for returning to the festival made him positive he was doing something right, and the filled sign up sheets in the variety of activists booths bode well for the next generation and their commitment to taking the reigns in the fight to make the world a better place.

Click the thumbnail(s) to view more photos from the show by Rex Thomson…

2013 Forecastle Music Festival (Day One)

2013 Forecastle Music Festival
Waterfront Park

Louisville, KY
July 12, 2013

Billy Nershi from The String Cheese Incident

Forecastle Festival set sail on Friday, July 12 in downtown Louisville, Kentucky with festival founder JK McKnight and partner Ashley Capps, one of the founders of Bonnaroo, at the wheel steering us towards new musical exploration.

Under beautiful blue skies, acts like The Pimps of Joytime, rising local stars Houndmouth, music legend Bob Mould from punk rock icons Husker Du and Night Beds, rapper Big Boi (still nursing an injured ankle from his Summer Camp set, but giving a wild show sitting in his throne), Old Crow Medicine Show, and Young The Giant brought the afternoon crowd a wide variety of sights and sounds to savor.

Jam band super stars The String Cheese Incident have taken over the host band duties for the weekend, and gave fans old and new an energetic, fun-filled set to close out the main stage for the night.

Here”s a gallery of shots to whet your appetite for our coming review – check back tomorrow for shots from day 2 from editor and senior photographer Rex Thomson of Rex-A-Vision.

Click on the thumbnails to view photos from the show by Rex Thomson.

Old Crow Medicine Show summer tour dates

_MG_8976Old Crow Medicine Show have announced a run of dates through this summer. The dates come on heels of a sold out tour of Canada. With many of the shows already sold out, some highlights of this summer will be shows with Mumford & Sons who handpicked them as special guests for their Gentlemen of the Road Stopovers in August.; as well as a doing dates with The Avett Brothers and a triumphant return to the Newport Folk Festival. Support on the band’s other dates will be provided by Jonny Fritz, Dale Watson, Parker Millsap, Chuck Mead, and Buddy Miller & Friends. For a full itinerary, please see below.

 

2013 Tour dates

 
June 5 – Booth Bay Harbor, ME @ The Opera House SOLD OUT
June 6 – Booth Bay Harbor, ME @ The Opera House SOLD OUT
June 7 – Port Chester, NY @The Capitol Theatre (w/Jonny Fritz)
June 8 – Gilford, NH @ Meadowbrook US Cellular Pavilion (supporting The Avett Brothers)
June 23 – Fayetteville, AR @ Arkansas Music Pavilion (w/3 Penny Acre)
June 24 – Wichita, KS @ The Cotillion (w/Parker Millsap)
June 25 – Boulder, CO @ Chautauqua Auditorium (w/Dale Watson) SOLD OUT
June 27 – San Francisco, CA @ The Warfield (w/Dale Watson)
June 28 – Redding, CA @ Cascade Theater (w/Dale Watson)
June 29 – Portland, OR @ Oregon Zoo Amphitheater (w/Dale Watson)
June 30 – Seattle, WA @ Woodland Park Zoo Amphitheater (w/Parker Millsap) SOLD OUT

 
July 2 – Spokane, WA @ The Fox Theatre (w/Parker Millsap)
July 3 – Missoula, MT @ The Wilma Theatre (w/Parker Millsap) SOLD OUT
July 4 – Jackson Hole, WY @ Snow King Resort (w/Parker Millsap)
July 5 – Salt Lake City, UT @ Red Butte Garden Amphitheater (w/Parker Millsap) SOLD OUT
July 6 – Morrison, CO @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre (supporting The Avett Brothers)
July 11 – Grand Rapids, MI @ Meijer Gardens (w/Cory Chisel) SOLD OUT
July 12 – Louisville, KY @ Forecastle Festival
July 13 – Chattanooga, TN @ Track 29 (w/Dale Watson)
July 25 – Jim Thorpe, PA @ Penn’s Pike (w/Chuck Mead)
July 26 – Newport, RI @ Newport Folk Festival
July 27 – Wilmington, DE @ The Grand Opera House (w/Chuck Mead)
July 28 – Floyd, VA @ FloydFest

 
August 3 – Nashville, TN @ Fontanel (w/Buddy Miller & Friends)
August 15 – Harrisonburg, VA @ Rockingham County Fair (w/Chuck Mead)
August 16 – Cleveland, OH @ Ohio Theatre (w/Chuck Mead)
August 17 – Sterling Heights, MI @ MO POP Music Festival
August 20 – Quebec City, QC @ Le Cercle
August 21 – Montreal, QC @ Corona Theatre
August 22 – Kingston, ON @ The Ale House
August 23 – Toronto, ON @ Danforth Music Hall
August 24- Simcoe, ON @ Norfolk County Fairgrounds (supporting Mumford & Sons) SOLD OUT
August 31 – Troy, OH @ Troy Memorial Stadium (supporting Mumford & Sons) SOLD OUT

Black Crowes, Devendra Banhart, more contribute to Song of America

A host of respected and Grammy winning indie artists have contributed to Song of America, a unique 50-song, three-CD set designed to tell the history of our country through song, from 1492 through modern times.  

Featuring a diverse array of artists including Folk Family Robinson (Black Crowes), the Blind Boys of Alabama, Devendra Banhart, Martha Wainwright, Andrew Bird, Janis Ian, Marah, Old Crow Medicine Show and more, the collection spans the folk, blues, rock, R&B, country, classical and hip-hop genres.  An ambitious but beatifully realized project, the three CDs deliver up gorgeous music as well as many interesting historical tidbits.

 

Continue reading Black Crowes, Devendra Banhart, more contribute to Song of America

Joe Ely given 2007 AMA Lifetime Achievement Award

The Americana Music Association announced the recipient of the 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award for Performing during a magical night where industry members and fans of the genre gathered to listen to and celebrate the musical legacy of past honoree Levon Helm. 

The AMA brought the legendary Helm to town for the “Ramble at the Ryman” Wednesday night, July 18th, his first “Ramble” outside of the New York area.  Before he performed AMA Executive Director Jed Hilly took to the stage of the Ryman Auditorium to formally recognize Helm for his achievement in 2003 and announce this year’s 2007 recipient in the same category. 

“Four years ago Levon received the Americana Lifetime Achievement Award for Performing, but due to personal health reasons was unable to come to Nashville, said Hilly.  “How honored are we that the man many people call the godfather of the Americana Roots Music movement is honoring us with his performance here tonight.”   

Hilly then went on to announce that the 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award for Performing award is being given to Joe Ely.  “Ely’s live shows have become legendary, and throughout his genre -crossing career, he has performed with Bruce Springsteen, Los Super Seven, and James McMurtry, The Clash and more recent acoustic tours with Lyle Lovett, John Hiatt, and Guy Clark.”  Ely is also nominated for the Americana Music Association’s Artist of the Year.

The presentation will be made to Ely November 1st at the historic Ryman Auditorium during the 6th Annual Americana Music Association’s Honors and Awards Show as part of the AMA’s annual conference in Nashville, Tennessee.  In addition the association will present the Lifetime Achievement Awards for Songwriter, Instrumentalist, Producer/Engineer, Spirit of Americana Free Speech Award, The Presidents Award and the Jack Emerson Executive Award.   Recipients in these categories will be announced between now and October.   During the November Awards ceremony the association will reveal its member voted winners for works released during the 12 month eligibility period from June 1, 2006 through May 31, 2007.  Those nominees include: 

 

Album of the Year

·        Emotionalism -The Avett Brothers (Ramseur)

·        Modern Times – Bob Dylan (Columbia)

·        West – Lucinda Williams (Lost Highway)

·        Children Running Through – Patty Griffin (ATO)

 

Artist of the Year

·        Joe Ely

·        Lucinda Williams

·        Patty Griffin

·        Todd Snider

 

Instrumentalist

·        Buddy Miller

·        Gurf Morlix

·        Sam Bush

·        Will Kimbrough

 

New and Emerging Artist

·        Amy LaVere

·        The Avett Brothers

·        Sunny Sweeney

·        Uncle Earl

 

Song of the Year

·         "Hank Williams’ Ghost" by Darrell Scott; appears on Invisible Man (Full Light Records) Publishers: Chuck Wagon Gourmet Music, Famous Music Corp

·         "Sometimes It Takes Balls to be a Woman" by Elizabeth Cook and Melinda Schneider; appears on Balls (31 Tigers) Publishers:  Elizabeth Cook Music, Royal Notes Music, NewMel Music

·         "Are You Alright?"  by Lucinda Williams; appears on West written (Lost Highway) Publishers: Warner Tamerlane Publishing Corp., Lucy Jones Music

·         "Heavenly Day" by Patty Griffin; appears on Children Running Through (ATO) Publishers: ALMO Music Corp, One Big Love Music

 

Duo/Group of the Year

·        The Avett Brothers

·        The Duhks

·        The Hacienda Brothers

·        Old Crow Medicine Show

·        Son Volt

Old Crow Medicine Show: Big Iron World

It must have seemed like a big iron world to the members of the Old Crow Medicine Show when they spent the first months of their existence in a cramped van, honing their skills on the street corners and alleys of what must have seemed like every town in Canada all those year ago.

The work paid dividends though, and now, with two records out on Nettwerk Record and infinite critical acclaim, the world is simply theirs for the taking – and they show no signs of letting up. Their latest, Big Iron World, is another in what hopefully is a long line of great neo-old-time/stringband/folk/bluegrass records.

Once again featuring a handful of well-penned originals along with some dusty old tunes they’ve spit-shined to a high gloss sheen, Big Iron World is O.C.M.S. at their infectious best singing good time songs of wine, women, and well, cocaine….again.