Tag Archives: Anders Beck

Let the Steel Play: Andy Hall and Roosevelt Collier

Andy Hall and Roosevelt Collier:  Let the Steel Play
Writer:  Kyler Klix

Not many musicians make a career out of the slide guitar, so music fans get a real treat with Let the Steel Play, the forthcoming album  from Andy Hall (Infamous Strindusters) and Roosevelt Collier (the Lee Boys). The result is music so beautiful, you could imagine angels in heaven playing steel guitar instead of harps. Continue reading Let the Steel Play: Andy Hall and Roosevelt Collier

A Band With No Drums: Greensky Bluegrass and If Sorrows Swim

Greensky Bluegrassedited

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Words and photos by Tim Newby

“A band with no drums,” says Paul Hoffman, mandolinist, singer, and songwriter in Greensky Bluegrass. Hoffman had been trying to best explain his band’s sound, which is a mix of traditional style bluegrass and a more adventurous brand of roots-rock. “I used to say that we are not a bluegrass band and try to convince people that there is more involved,” says Hoffman, “but we absolutely are a bluegrass band and can play the shit out of some bluegrass. We just don’t do it all day. It is not all we do.” With a taste of the humor the gives the band much of its personality and makes them so much fun to see live, Hoffman continues with tongue firmly in cheek, “Besides the pun wouldn’t make any sense without the second word in our name.”

Hoffman is right though; bluegrass is not all they do. They are so much more than that. While their music is built firmly up the traditional bluegrass sound with their line-up of banjo, mandolin, acoustic guitar, Dobro, and upright bass, the way in which they reinterpret that traditional sound is miles away from what Bill Monroe and Earl Scruggs first played so many years ago. While they have those elements that one would expect to find in traditional bluegrass – acoustic instruments, fast virtuosic playing, tight vocal harmonies, and instrumental solo breakdowns – it is what they do with those simple elements that sets the band apart from the past and points towards the future.   DSCN1704

Greensky Bluegrass have always tread the line between the old and the new, moving easily from traditional tunes such as “Working on a Building,” or “Pig in a Pen,” to Bruce Hornsby’s “King of the Hill,” or Traffic’s “Light up or Leave me Alone,”  throughout the course of their high-energy live shows.  This chameleon-like ability is shown fully on their song “All Four” from their 2011 album Handguns. The song starts with what seemingly seems to be a simple finger picked banjo led-lament that quickly dissolves into a lengthy, adventurous jam the likes of which would be completely foreign to those only reared in traditional bluegrass. In concert “All Four” is even more of a beast, regularly stretching past the fifteen minute-mark. And let’s be honest your parent’s bluegrass does not regularly include fifteen-minute spacey jams that jockey for position on the interstellar overdrive highway.   It is this mix of the old and the new that has enabled Greensky Bluegrass to explode over the past couple of years and establish themselves as leaders of the new jam-grass movement.

Since forming in 2000 in Kalamazoo, Michigan around the trio of banjo-picker Michael Arlen Bont, guitarist Dave Bruzza, and mandolinist Paul Hoffman, the band has seen a steady, rapid growth.  They added bassist Mike Devol in 2004 which was soon followed by a win at the prestigious band contest at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival in 2006. Shortly after, 2007, they rounded out their line-up when they added Dobroist Anders Beck.  The addition of Beck helped solidify the band’s progressive take on bluegrass. DSCN2452edited

In 2010 at the annual Delfest the band had a coming-out-party of sorts. They played three sets over the course of the weekend and with each set seemed to see their audience increase in size each time. The three sets also served to showcase all the far-ranging aspects of Greensky’s diverse musical personality. They started the weekend playing along with Del McCoury and host of guests when their main stage set was rained out and they moved inside to the Music Hall and played as part of the songwriter showcase.  Their set inside ended up being more a showcase for Greensky and their traditional chops as they played a set that was nothing but old covers and bluegrass songs. The following morning the band started the day again inside the Music Hall playing a set list that was entirely made up of rock covers that do not normally rear their heads in the bluegrass world, which allowed the band to exhibit their unmatched ability to meld completely diverse styles of music into something wholly unique. Greensky’s final set of the weekend was to a packed field at the side stage during which they played nothing but original material. It was the perfect capstone to the weekend as the band had shown all facets of their vast musical spectrum over their three sets and defined what truly makes up the music of Greensky Bluegrass, a mix that Hoffman describes as “our material, bluegrass, and those weird covers and other things we bring to bluegrass or we bring bluegrass too.”   2014-09-07_12-16-01

This diversity of the band’s musical persona is perfectly captured on the band’s latest album, the stunning If Sorrows Swim. The album, like the band, veers from style to style, yet does so while maintaining an identity that is wholly Greensky. The album was built around the skeleton of twelve songs written by the band’s primary songwriters Hoffman and guitarist Bruzza, yet arranged by the whole band. Hoffman says the band’s approach this time was different than on previous albums. “We had worked on the songs some before we got into the studio, but this time more than any other album it was undecided what the shape of it would be until we got into the studio. It was pretty drastic sometimes. We would say, ‘Let’s play this song bluegrassy, let’s try it halftime, folky, swingy,’ there was a lot of freedom and possibilities.” The songs slowly developed and took shape both on stage and in the studio. For Hoffman one of the toughest things was finally saying a song was finished, “Each song morphed and changed and that is one of the hard things of making a record, that commitment to the song and the final draft of it.”

The final draft of If Sorrows Swim is a schizophrenic mix, bouncing from the heartfelt lament of album opener “Windshield,” toGSBG the classic banjo roll on “Letter to Seymour,” to the rocking one-two punch of “Kerosene,” and “Demons,” but a schizophrenic mix that has a unifying, cohesive feel to it. “Working song arrangement and order was a challenge with this record,” explains Hoffman, “This is not a concept album where clearly this song goes before this one and leads into this one like Dark Side of the Moon that is all in the key of A and B and all relative pitch wise and it just goes the way it goes because that’s how it goes.” To help with the sequencing of the album, Hoffman says the band thought of it like one of their lives shows and paced it like they would a set list. “When we write a set list we pay attention to how it’s going to flow and where to put the fast ones in and where to put the spacey ones in. So I think the album flows like that.” This approach to pacing and song-order was born from the band’s desire to always keep things interesting on stage. “Early on we didn’t want to just play bluegrass all night long because that would be boring to just go chucka-chucka all night,” says Hoffman, “Sometimes we want to go boom-boom!” This live set list approach to the sequencing of the album rewards a long attention span, as it moves and peaks like a concert and takes the listener on a sonic, emotional journey.   DSCN2458edited

The album opens with the slow-burning build-up of “Windshield.” “Windshield” is a powerful opener Hoffman describes as a “real four-on-the-floor, downbeat, back chop which is sorta the opposite of what we are supposed to do.” It is precisely the kind of huge song U2 would have written in the eighties if they had decided to ditch their pretentious rock-leanings and grab acoustic instruments and pick some bluegrass. The song is a compelling statement from Greensky about what they are capable of and where they are going musically. While it hints at the band’s bluegrass roots, it highlights their ability to take those roots and push them all over the musical map. The rest of the album follows this exploratory template laid down in the first song. Over the course of If Sorrows Swim Greensky uses inventive song structures, tasteful melodic phrasing, and unique sonic textures to create an album that pushes the limits and boundaries of bluegrass-inspired music into the stratosphere, going to realms never visited by the banjo and mandolin before.

The dynamics of having two primary songwriters, with Hoffman’s more rock-styled tunes and Bruzza’s elegantly traditional sounding songs, help create a contrast of themes and styles that work to flesh out the personality of the album. Hoffman DSCN1483editedmentions some of the new ideas and chances he has been taking in his songwriting and how they have been influenced by some unlikely musicians:

I like to listen to something that I can get an idea about song structure and melodic tendencies from because folk and bluegrass stays pretty formulaic. What’s great about our band is I can write great songs that stand alone with me singing and playing guitar, but we are also a rock band that does all this exploratory stuff and can open it up and explore every night and there is a real balance between the two.

I listen to an album by a band like Alt-J and it is all about textures and I love the feel and mood of the music. Then I will listen to Jason Isabell’s new record and be like, man, this guy can write some friggin’ lyrics and I am inspired by both things in a different way.

DSCN1736editedGreensky Bluegrass has been on a steady trajectory upward since their first days as a band. They have seen half-full venues become packed the next time they visit, they have seen early-afternoon side-stage timeslots grow into main stage headlining slots at festivals, and they have seen their fan base organically grow as Hoffman proudly declares, “a handful of fans at a time.” With the release of If Sorrows Swim and the way it will appeal to a broad spectrum of fans, those fans will most likely grow at a rate much greater rate than a handful at a time. If Sorrows Swim seems to herald broad, new horizons for the band; Hoffman says that while they are excited they look took to keep things in perspective. “I hope this record gets as much attention as it can get, but we don’t want anything we don’t deserve. I would love to see some more of that crossover to fans of something like Jason Isabell who didn’t think they liked bluegrass, but they really like one of our songs or a fan of Alt-J who can listen and think ‘Wow, these guys can make some nice textures.’ Just like I cross over in my tastes, I want people to not be afraid that we are a bluegrass band, so that they will actually sink in and realize they like it. And that seems to happen more and more every year and the more that happens the prouder I am,” Hoffman pauses before finishing his thought, “It is all about good music. It is either good or it is not.”

Everyone Orchestra, 5/18/13

Everyone Orchestra
Oriental Theatre

Denver, Colorado
May 18, 2013

 

One never knows what to expect with the Matt Butler led Everyone Orchestra, an ever-changing variety of some of music’s finest that has likely already been at a festival near you; each year he is tasked with assembling a cast of players for All Good Festival’s annual Rex Jam, a benefit for the Rex Foundation.

If you are still unsure, think “madman, top hat, dry erase board and random talent being directed by said madman on said dry erase board.”

Indeed at first site it appears that what Butler has managed to do is pull off the title of “successfully traveling musician with the lightest load-in ever” for over a decade. In effect, he has. But along the way, his knack for being fully willing to fall on his face coupled with an obvious sense for where to go next, has resulted in him hosting notables from virtually every standard bearer on the circuit and in the meantime, raise money and spread the message for and of worthy environmental causes.

This night would be no different when bluegrass heavyweights – guitarist Billy Nershi (String Cheese Incident), violinist Tim Carbone (Railroad Earth) and Dobro ninja Anders Beck (Greensky Bluegrass) – and members of some of Colorado’s finest musical exports took the stage before a sold-out crowd at Denver’s Oriental Theatre.

Honest Tune’s Brad Hodge was on the scene to bring back images from the action.

 

Click on the thumbnail(s) to view photos from the show by Brad Hodge

(see below the gallery for the evening’s full cast and audio)

 

 

 

Everyone Orchestra | 5/18/13

Cast: Matt Butler- Conductor, Billy Nershi (String Cheese Incident), Tim Carbone (Railroad Earth), Anders Beck (Greensky Bluegrass), Dave Watts (The Motet), Jans Ingber (The Motet), Kai Eckhardt (Garaj Mahal) special guests Tanya Shylock and Bill McKay

 

 

Handgun Shootin’ with Greensky Bluegrass : an Honest Tune Interview (VIDEO)

When you enter into the realm of interviewing musicians, you never truly know what to expect. Some interviews are sterile. Others are strictly promotional. Sometimes they get deeply personal. Then there is this interview.

While on the scene at Music on the Mountaintop, Rex Thomson and David Shehi sat down with Greensky Bluegrass. What ensued was an episode of pure organic comedy. Sure, they talked about their new album, Handguns, which by the way, is an outstanding album. But in between the lines of music talk and album promotions was a  demonstration of games that they play on the road, (intentional) confusion between foreskin and foresight, cracking on the interviewer (“It’s a think piece”), misquoted movies and so much more gold that you will simply have to see for yourself.

But make no mistake about it, these highly affable and humorous guys are also serious musicians who are taking the bluegrass scene by storm with honest songwriting, instrument mastery, seamless improvisation and beautifully sung vocals.

 

Handgun Shootin’ w/ Greensky Bluegrass (Interview)

For more on Greensky Bluegrass and to download the Handguns EP, click here
 Scroll down to stream the tracks (“I’d Probably Kill You” and “Handguns”) that were featured in the video

I’d Probably Kill You – Handguns EP by Greensky Bluegrass Handguns – Handguns EP by Greensky Bluegrass