Los Lonely Boys: Sacred

Epic/Or Music/One Haven

Southwestern trio Los Lonely Boys return to rock with Sacred, the first album of original material since their 2004 debut. Sounding like a cross between Stevie Ray Vaughan and Los Lobos, the Garza brothers —Henry, JoJo and Ringo— turn in an inspired disc full of hairpin musical twists and turns, showing off a rich heritage of cultural diversity near the Texas/Mexico border.

 

True, some of Sacred's hot spots are the pop oriented big production numbers like the fluff and sass of the radio ready "Roses." But, John Porter and Mark Wright's crisp, clear assistance at Pedernales studios in Austin, Texas equals a larger, more inclusive Los Lonely Boys recording that stretches across a wider spectrum and is destined to bring the band a broader demographic.

 

The opener "My Way," smolders with the Texas roadhouse blues of Henry Garza's guitar and vocals meshing with JoJo's fluent, rhythmic forays on bass guitar. The Texas Horns chime in to lend a hand, and "My Way" fulfills Los Lonely Boys' promise from their first outing, setting them on an extended career path as headliners. "Diamonds" is another gem benefiting from Porter and Wright's techno enhancing savvy, and Ringo's stormy drum breaks pop up into the forefront of the mix.

 

Aficionado's of the SRV, Albert Collins school of showy, electrified blues will enthuse on Henry's scorching wall of sound on "Oye Mamacita." The Boys bring out the mellower, Latin romantic side of their background on "I Never Met a Woman." And, they get a little help from their father, Enrique Garza, Sr., and mentor Willie Nelson on the country flavored "Outlaws." Sacred sets up the building blocks of Los Lonely Boys' escalating pyramid, putting them in rarefied territory with past greats that have crossed the rock and roll and blues divide, laying a solid groundwork that stands the test of time.                 

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