String Cheese Incident Jams at the Portsmouth Pavilion

String Cheese Incident Jams at the Portsmouth Pavilion
July 10, 2016
Portsmouth, VA
Photographer/Writer: Mark Robbins

Colorado sextet String Cheese Incident played 2 other worldly sets to more than 500 of their devoted followers Sunday night in Portsmouth, Va. For close to 3 hours (70 minute and 90 minute sets) babies in ear protective headphones to aging Deadheads danced and sang along to the bands brand of feel good music. Helped out in the second set by Yonder Mountain String Band who opened the show, the two bands appeared to be having as much fun on stage as the audience.

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Set One
Restless Wind, Sometimes A River, Born On The Wrong Planet, Pygmy Pony, Stop Drop Roll, Could You Be Loved > Beautiful
Set Two
Think Of What You’ve Done1 > Big Mon1, Blackberry Blossom1 > Son of a Preacher Man1, Rollover > Valley of the Jig, Sweet Spot, You’ve Got the World, Hotel Window > Rollover
Notes
1 with Yonder Mountain String Band

The Travelin’ Kine: Change In The Wind

It would be perfectly understandable for those not in the know to believe that country music is dead. In the mainstream, it has felt this way for the better part of the last three decades. But the sparks of a few real songwriters – with influences like Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Merle Haggard – are building to a full-blown fire. And while Jamey Johnson, Sturgill Simpson, and Chris Stapleton, are leading the charge, there are upstarts in cities around the country who are kicking up true country songs filled with the sweat and grit of yesterday. One of them is The Travelin’ Kine.

These troubadours from Charleston, South Carolina, have now delivered their first album, entitled Change in the Wind, and although the title and title track don’t necessarily allude to the current state of country music, it seems apropos given the emergence of musicians that harken back to the good old days of the genre. And the band delivers an eight-song set that is straight-talking, compositionally adept, and soaked in spirits from some backwoods still.

“Change in the Wind,” written on the day frontman Slaton Glover’s divorce papers were signed and he dedicated his life to music, rides the brisk rhythm section of bassist Brent Poulson and drummer Jim Donnelly, giving momentum to his yearning. “I’m Not As Smart As You Look” spotlights Glover’s clever wordplay with sinewy lead guitar from Scottie Frier, “I Hate You” is a scornful wish for a former lover, and “Bad Bad Man” is a roadhouse rally cry accented by flourishes of harmonica and mandolin, courtesy of Mark Davis and David Vaughan, respectively.

At the heart of the album’s eight tracks is Glover’s adept songwriting. There are no frills here, and that is just right.
The Travelin’ Kine are yet another new voice in a country music chorus that is growing louder, and if there is such a thing as “real” country music today, it can be found on Change in the Wind.

Change in the Wind is independently released and out now.

Merryland Music Festival ready to kick-off

MerrylandSet to take place July 8-10 at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, MD, the Inaugural Merryland Music Festival looks to carry on the long tradition of excellence of the All Good Festival which announced it would be retiring after last year’s edition.

Presented by All Good Presents, Merryland will feature seventeen bands over two days, that will take advantage of Merriweather’s new state of the art turntable stage and have no overlapping sets.

The festivities will get going Friday July 8 with a pair of kick-off concerts, Papadiso with ELM at Baltimore’s Ram Heads Live and the Soul Rebel’s with People’s Blues of Richmond at the 9:30 Club.

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Day one at Merriweather will be headlined by two sets from the String Cheese Incident and also feature sets from Lotus, Stephen Marley, Yonder Mountain String Band, Karl Denson, Tauk, Protojoe, and ELM.  Day two will find Ben Harper and the Innocent Criminals headling with Grace Potter, Greensky Bluegrass, Shakey Graves, Langhorne Slim, Nahko & the Medicine for the People, Pigeons Playing Ping-Pong, Turkuaz, and the Cris Jacobs Band rounding out the rest of the day.  There will also be a very special late-night show July 9 at the 9:30 Club hosted by Kung Fu and Featuring Karl Denson along with many special guests.

Doors will open each day at noon with the first set of music getting going at 1:00pm and wrapping up at 11:00pm.   Weekend and single day tickets can be purchased here.

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moe. at Thompson’s Point

moe.
Thompson’s Point
Portland, Maine
June 17 – 18, 2016
Special Guests: June 17th, The Wood Brothers, Cabinet and June 18th Twiddle, Percy Hill

Photographer: Greg Gouwens

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Huck Finn Jubilee Bluegrass Festival 2016

Huck Finn Jubilee 2016
June 10-12
40th Anniversary
Ontario, CA
Photographer: Allen Erwin

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My Morning Jacket Louisville Kentucky Iroquois Amphitheater

My Morning Jacket
Louisville Kentucky Iroquois Amphitheater
May 2016
Photographer: Brad Kuntz

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New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival 2016

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival 2016
April 28 – May 7, 2016
Writer/Photographer: Bob Adamek

The 2016 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival delivered high doses of everything you could imagine. There was sunshine and rain, an overwhelming choice of music presented on 12 stages, food vendors that outdo the restaurants in many major cities, and 425,000+ music fans ready for all of it.

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During the second weekend of Jazz Fest, the rain was often the story, coming down hard enough on late Saturday afternoon that the festival producers wisely shut the festival down. The ensuing flash flood swamped the Fair Grounds and the unfortunate result was that the sets by afternoon headliners had to be cancelled. This included Stevie Wonder, Beck, Snoop Dog, Buddy Guy and Arturo Sandoval. Stevie Wonder later showed up at Irving Mayfield’s Playhouse on Bourbon St. to sit in with Mayfield and Trombone Shorty. Meanwhile Beck found his way to Preservation Hall where he joined the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and members of Arcade Fire and My Morning Jacket for a late night second line around the French Quarter.

A moderate steady rain persisted almost all day on Sunday as well, but seasoned festival goers geared up and saw great sets from Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt, Mavis Staples, Arlo Guthrie, Trombone Shorty and two much anticipated guest filled tribute sets, one for Allen Toussaint and one for B.B. King. B.B. King’s tribute set included songs lead by Bonnie Raitt, Buddy Guy, Elvin Bishop, Dr. John, Tab Benoit, Walter Wolfman Washington and Luther Kent. The set finished off with all the guests playing “The Thrill is Gone” in what was one of the festival highlights.

005 Bonnie Raitt

Earlier in the week for most of Thursday and Friday, the weather stayed very nice, allowing fans to move around with much less gear. Thursday was highlighted on the two main stages by Elvis Costello, who was energetic and happy as he rolled through 30+ years of hits. On the Acura Stage fans were treated to the Tedeschi Trucks Band with special guests Jimmie Vaughan and Billy F. Gibbons. Tedeschi Trucks are resetting the bar in live music for their incredible blend of soulful vocals and impeccable musicianship.

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Their songs are tuneful and their solos are thoughtful, never droning on past the point. The addition of ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons and blues master Jimmie Vaughan added a high level of excitement for the fans. This was also fun for the band, as they traded off on solos, each listening intently to the other, throwing their heads back and laughing as the four guitarists threw down.

014 Jimmie Vaughan

The Acura Stage hosted another top guitar slinger on Thursday when Austin Texas’ own, Gary Clark Jr. took over. Clark’s guitar playing is raw, energetic and emotion packed, much like his soulful vocals. Simultaneously, on the Gentilly Stage, Brandi Carlile gave a very high energy set of her own after stating that it was a long awaited honor to be playing Jazz Fest.

003 Gary Clark Jr

Jazz Fest really offers something for everyone. There is a 2500 seat blues tent, a 1500 seat jazz tent and 1500 seat Gospel tent. The Fais Do-Do stage features Cajun, Zydeco, and all other types of roots music. The third main stage at the festival is Congo Square, which featured groove-centric music like the Isley Brothers, Big Freeda, Flo Rida, Cyril Neville and Swamp Funk, Tony Hall’s New Orleans Soul Stars tribute to James Brown and the Friday headliner, Ms. Lauryn Hill. Hill has been getting beat up in the media lately for showing up late to her concerts, including two hours late in Atlanta. But at Jazz Fest she was only 15 minutes behind. She came out with flawless makeup and vestments, played guitar and sang with every bit of emotion she could squeeze out, turning in a stellar performance.

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At the Jazz and Heritage Stage, you can see the greatest visual treat of the festival, the Mardi Gras Indian bands. Donning hand sewn suits made of brightly colored feathers and beads, the Mardi Gras Indian bands play traditional music that has been in their culture for decades. Chant styled songs like “Shoo-fly”, “Injuns Here They Come” and “Let’s Go Get ‘Em” are staples of bands like The Wild Magnolias, White Cloud Hunter, Fi Yi Yi & the Mandingo Warriors and the 101 Runners. These bands were joined on stage by some of the city’s top musicians, including Sousaphonist Kirk Joseph, drummer Ray Webber and guitarists June Yamagishi and Billy Iuso.

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Jazz Fest veterans know that the headliners aren’t really the main dish. It’s the undercard, with so many local bands playing, that really give Jazz Fest its true flavor. Some of those highlights were turned in by George Porter Jr. and Runnin’ Pardners during a rain soaked but very well attended early Thursday set. Two brass bands that almost never gig, except at Jazz Fest, played to overflow crowds. The New Orleans Nightcrawlers played on Thursday, then the wildly popular Midnite Disturbers on Saturday. Both bands are packed with the city’s best brass players from bands like Galactic, Rebirth Brass Band, Dirty Dozen Brass Band and Big Sam’s Funky Nation. Bonerama shredded the Gentilly Stage on Friday, followed by Raw Oyster Cult (ROC). ROC has the guitarists and drummer from the Radiators, and the band was joined by the remaining Radiators mid-set for a quick reunion. New Orleans fastest rising stars gave a festival highlight set on Friday when the Revivalists were joined by guest percussionist Mike Dillon. Their incredible song writing and no holds barred stage show left the festival buzzing.

013 The Revivalists

Once a little hunger sets in the festival is well armed to accommodate. Most dishes run $5-$10, and include delicacies like crawfish/zucchini/spinach bisque, Pheasant/Quail/Andouille Sausage Gumbo, Chochon de lait Po-Boy, bread pudding with white chocolate sauce or a scrumptious Cuban sandwich.

062 Midnite Disturbers

The night time action in New Orleans during Jazz Fest is second to none. The city’s numerous clubs play host to 2 or 3 bands a night including all-star one off bands and national touring acts alike. Clubs like Tipitina’s, The Howlin’ Wolf, d.b.a., The Maple Leaf and One Eyed Jacks host amazing shows, and music flows out of everywhere through the French Quarter and Frenchmen Street.

038 Tribute to BB King

Jazz Fest is a bucket list event for any music fan. But once you get a taste of this amazing event, it is hard to think of ever missing it again.

Interview with Gary Chetkof: Founder of Mountain Jam Festival and principal owner of Radio Woodstock 100.1

Interview with Gary Chetkof: Founder of Mountain Jam Festival and principal owner of Radio Woodstock 100.1
Interviewer/photographer: Vernon Webb

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The history: What was your inspiration for Mountain Jam and how did it come about? What was the inspiration?

It is Radio Woodstock 25th year anniversary. I wanted to put on an outdoor party. Found Hunter Mountain and it’s a beautiful location. We had five bands and it was a one day event. After everyone said how amazing it was we decided to do it again the next year. The following year the festival was two days; the next year three days. The growth in size and sound was organic, it was unplanned and spontaneous. Gov’t Mule was the first headliner, they were onboard from the get go. I had been at Woodstock 94, 99; Bonnaroo and thought it was the coolest thing in the world to escape from the world and meet new people and experience new music. Michael Franti has been on the bill since the second year. The Avett Brothers, Grace Potter, almost every year. The community of musicians and fans that get together shows musical diversity, it’s a good mix of old and new. Ya, it’s incredible and bigger than we ever imagined. Mountain Jam I and II, started out with half a dozen people, now it’s probably thousands of people. Every year it’s like wow, I can’t believe it.

The town budget has increased. By year three Phil Lesh and Friends; year five Allman Brothers, Gov’t Mule’s Levon Helm Tribute. Last year, we had the Black Keys and Robert Plant. Never imagined they would have this level of talent.

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I’ve heard rumors of it being moved, is there any merit in that? If so any thoughts on a good place to move too?

It got big, we are constantly thinking of ways to make it good but not too crowded. We do not want to change location. You always look to see options but no intentions of moving. It’s an incredibly beautiful spot, green rolling hills, hiking trails, biking trails, it’s hard to beat. We’ve moved things around so there’s not as many hospitality tents. We want to keep it at Hunter mountain as long as possible.

What are some of the bands that represent the feel of Mountain Jam?

Gov’t Mule and Michael Franti are the soul of the festival. Warren is an amazing guitar player, they are the nicest guys. Franti is on a whole other level where he lifts people’s spirits. The combination of the two is very powerful. Franti has a way to make it stop raining, sunshine for Franti. There was one year there was a rainbow when Franti played. (In fact in stopped raining and the rainbow came out during The Sound Of Sunshine.)

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How does rain affect Mountain Jam?

It doesn’t rain every year, you’re there for 4 days, it’s going to rain at least 1 or 2 days. Years 2 and 3 we had a lot of rain and you develop a reputation. Years 4 and 5 no rain but there is the reputation of rain. The perception isn’t really the reality, it is unpredictable. Franti said it’s the only festival where you get all four seasons at one festy. Everybody knows to come with all different clothes to the festival.

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What do you like most about putting on Mountain Jam?

Putting the music together is the best part. You get some of your favorite bands together to create the festival. Seeing the creation come to life is my favorite part. There’s a million moving parts, improvisation things that happen where you have to deal with the unexpected. I have a large staff that takes care of most things and only contact me when there is really important things.

What advice would you give to someone who’s wanting to create a festival?

Don’t do it! (lots of laughter) It’s hard to start a festival now. There was a time and place where it was easy. Now it’s very regulated, competitive it was a lot easier and fun at the start. It’s an honor and a privilege to be creating the festival. I feel really lucky. You get to see your friends, like extended family, like a reunion. Cool thing to do but it’s hard to get it started now because of big competition.

Why you got rid of smaller stage on the side?

The only reason we got rid of the small stage was we simply ran out of room and needed the room for something else and issues with sound bleeding over. There’s not a lot of space so you have to compromise.

What are the plans for next year?

I’d like to have all the bands I couldn’t get to this year. I have pie in the sky dreams of who I have in mind.

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Poor Man’s Whiskey at the Great American Music Hall

Great American Music Hall
Saturday, Mar. 19, 2016
San Francisco, CA
Writer/Photographer: Susan Weiand
Poor Man’s Whiskey brought their foot stomping, good time music to the legendary Great American Music Hall in San Francisco on Saturday March 19. Opening the evening was an acoustic version of Lonesome Locomotive, who delivered a harmonious set of their folky rock to the appreciative crowd.  Poor Man’s Whiskey music can be described as “High Octane Hootenanny” which is an upbeat combination of bluegrass, rock, folk  and country with clever songwriting and entertaining  stage antics thrown in.  Tonight the highly excited crowd was dancing and singing along to the infectiously good time music. Poor Man’s Whiskey is known for their innovative bluegrass covers of Dark Side of the Moon (shine),  Paul Simon’s Graceland, The Allman Brothers,  Old and in The Way, and tonight they paid tribute to music of The Eagles. Their second set evolved into a audience sing-along with such Eagle favorites as “Peaceful Easy Feeling”, “Lyin Eyes”, “Hotel California”, “Desperado”,  “Life in the Fast Lane” and many others.

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